Sometimes polkadots can be rambly messes too.

If you live in Australia (and haven't been living under a rock) you'll know that we're gearing up for an election. For me, this election season has been fraught with anger and sadness. 

I'm angry that at the last election a majority of the people whom I share this country with believed the lies that The Liberal party and our right wing "unbiased" media fed us. I'm angry that the Liberal government continues to try to continue the deceit. I'm angry that Asylum seekers aren't treated like people and with respect, and are instead left to torch themselves, and die slow traumatic deaths in off shore detention. I'm angry that the budget proposal screws over the majority, and I'm angry that I've had to wait 3 long years before I can do anything to change our governmental situation. 

When I'm tired of feeling angry all I can feel is sadness. Our country is a very sad place at the moment, and I don't know if there will ever be an escape. 

To add to my political frustrations, the NSW state government keeps doing shitty things, like dismantling elected local governments and appointing unelected administrators in their places. I have no words for how the political class is treating everyone else. They're so separate, yet their decisions affect literally everything. And somehow there are still people who don't care! I just can't hey. 

Anyway, all of these feelings are why I've not been around on this little internet space. My head has been spinning with too many negative thoughts, which makes it 1)hard to make outfits 2) hard to find motivation to shoot (also hard because the sun is setting earlier and earlier) 3) motivation to compile all the things into a post. 

I shot this outfit a little over a week ago when I went for a walk with my parents along a local cycle path. I put this outfit together in one of my brief periods of not feeling angry. I also managed to ladder these tights when I returned home from shooting this outfit. 

Ugh, this has been so rambly and stuff. Whatever. That's where my head is yo. 

Maybe I'll run off and join the circus...

I'm going to keep my words short this evening, because writing words is hard for me at the moment (There's so much stuff floating in my head, and writing isn't my choice way of clearing the noise.) I made these pants last week, and styled them like this. They're made from the same pattern as my pinecone pants and my daisy jeans. Enjoy the pretty pictures! 

Diamante Teacup Princess

It's been a long couple of weeks yo. I've been doing a lot of thinking, and having a lot of feelings. I've also been falling into the endless stream of "Youtube Beauty Vlogger with calm voice" as a way to get away from the thoughts and feelings. Anyway, whilst my head is in a muddle, my blog posts are probably going to be more photography than wordy. 

The posts are probably going to be a little less frequent as well. (I intended to get this edited and posted thursday last week, but that kind of didn't happen... Oh well) 

I will finish off by saying how great are these tights!? They're covered in jewels AND even though they're thin, they totally didn't ladder on the first wear! :D 

Daisy Chains

If you're friends with me on facebook, you would have seen me sharing quite a bit of stuff about why the Sydney Lockout Laws are pretty darn terrible for the city. On the outside the laws say "We're making a safe space for the community" but the reality of the situation is much more complex. 

 If you don't already know, the laws stop bars/clubs/venues from letting people in after 1:30am, and stop bars/clubs/venues serving spirits after 12am and alcohol after 3am in the Sydney CBD area in an aim to curb "alcohol fueled violence". The laws were hastily thrown together after the 2012 murder of Thomas Kelly and the 2013 murder of Daniel Christie. These deaths were avoidable and tragic, but happened well before "Lockout" in their prospective years. 

Now, I would be lying if I said that the Lockout Laws haven't achieved their goal. Violence is down by about 40 percent in the CBD. But at what cost? Foot traffic is down 80 percent  (Now, I'm pretty terrible at math and can't do the equation, but that means proportionally violence has increased) Countless Bars, Pubs and Clubs are shutting down (Not even Kabab shops are safe), taking with it hundreds of jobs for both bar staff and musicians. More than this, the violence that was in the CBD has now spread to other areas in Sydney. As well as "getting rid of the violence" the lockout laws are killing the city. 

I personally am not really sure about the argument that Australians have a uniquely violent relationship with alcohol. I've read some very compelling well sourced articles either way, but lets say we do have a problem. There are other ways to fix rather than saying "no you've been bad, now nobody can have it". For instance, increased public transport with more police and more/better education at a high school level (I remember my classes about alcohol were "it's bad for you, so don't drink. Think the alcoholic equivalent of abstinence only education). The installation of a night mayor (like Amsterdam and Paris) to be responsible for making the nightlife vibrant AND safe. 

"Why are people complaining about not being able to get drunk at 4 in the morning when there are more important issues" you may ask. The answer to this very valid question is that it's not actually about getting drunk and partying. The lockout laws signalled the last straw between Gen x/y and the Baby Boomer generation. 

This article says it best, but here's a summary: the Baby Boomers who are in power have locked younger generations out of great educations, home ownership, pensions, fair welfare, and stability, but now on top of this, they have made it abundantly clear that we are not "mature" "responsible" and "moral" enough for recreation. The protests about lockout are more a reaction to our rights to being adults and using public space being chipped away until we're left with a conservative totalitarian government that rule every aspect of our lives in the name of "morality" and "safety". When we were growing up, they talked about us being "cotton wool kids". Now that we're adults, the generation is insisting of keeping this same "cotton wool attitude" for "our own good".  

As well as keeping us safe "for our own good" these laws are laced with political agenda. Did you know that in the whole "lockout area" there's a rather large space exempt from the laws. This space is in the location, and shape of the Star City Casino  as shown in that handy dandy map to your right. Other venues that have exemptions from lockout are only allowed to stay open as long as they stop selling alcohol and the only form of entertainment are poker machines. (I don't know about you, but this seems more than a little fishy, especially considering the Star City Casino has a reputation as one of the mostly violent venues

I'll finish by saying this: The politics behind lockout are extraordinarily complicated, and there's a lot of information and miss information to be had. Make sure you question your views and do your research, because the reality, and what the government wants you to think is reality are two very different kettles of fish. 

 

EDIT: If you want to join in the action to keep sydney from becoming the suburbs you can do so Here (Reclaim The Streets) and Here (Keep Sydney Open)

Down the Garden Path

I've been doing a lot of living offline recently because of gigs and festivals. Every time I come home, I have a few days before I have to leave again. (This has actually been my life all of January) 

The craziness started Thursday evening with a gig at the Gaelic Club. Button Collective opened for the East Pointers (who are a crazy good Folk/Celtic Trio from Canada) From there, we proceeded to spend the rest of the weekend at Bulli for the Illawarra Folk Festival. 

Shirt: Thrifted, Belt: Home Made, Skorts: Home Made, Tights: Ebay, Boots: Dr Martens 

Shirt: Thrifted, Belt: Home Made, Skorts: Home Made, Tights: Ebay, Boots: Dr Martens 

I adore Folk Festivals. There's such a special vibe surrounding them, probably because most people who attend also play music. Unlike commercial festivals, there's virtually no separation between artists and patrons, which makes everything feel super intimate and community oriented.

Illawarra was such a great festival. I met so many cool people, saw so much brilliant music, had so many great Jams, played some great gigs with Button Collective, and played some unexpected gigs with Rebecca Bastoli (Who is not only a lovely person, but a great songwriter. I had so much fun playing with her and her band) and Scarlete's Revenge (They had unexpected lineup troubles, so I had a jam with them to cover some parts they were missing). 

Usually after a festival I spend the next few days recovering and feeling sad that I'm not still there playing all the gigs and jamming all the time. I had none of that as Monday and Tuesday I was occupied with Flutation, which is an Annual Flute Summer School run by Rosalie Bourne and Vanessa Ropa. 

I was lucky enough to be put in a smallish ensemble of great Flutists lead by Rosamund Plummer. She picked out some great repertoire (We played a Flute Quartet arrangement of a Bach Piano invention (I don't remember which one) and a Piece by Gary Schocker called Pop) I pretty much spent the whole time taking my Bass flute for a spin in this ensemble. I also participated in Shawn Barlow's Beatboxing workshop, and Luke Gallen's improv workshop, which were brilliantly run and quite educational. 

Shapes is also back in action as of this week! We had a jam to write some fresh music, and will probably start gigging again in March, which will be lovely.

This is my last night at home before I'm off yet again (this time for a wedding!) So it may be more than a few days between posts.